Visit Destinations

Your national forests and grasslands are 193 million acres of vast, scenic beauty waiting for you to discover. Visitors who choose to recreate on these public lands find more than 150,000 miles of trails, 10,000 developed recreation sites, 57,000 miles of streams, 122 alpine ski areas, 338,000 heritage sites, and specially designated sites that include 9,100 miles of byways, 22 recreation areas, 11 scenic areas, 439 wilderness areas, 122 wild and scenic rivers, nine monuments, and one preserve. And remember, “It’s All Yours.”

Rec Area Description Status
Bret Point #649

The Bret Point Trail #649 is a steep, short trail which receives most of its use by the range permittees who drive their cattle out on Bret Point.  It is the only designated route providing access to Big Dominguez Canyon from the drainage’s east rim.  The trail descends off the rim at a steep grade along a large draw/canyon that feeds into Big Dominguez Creek.  It continues through large, old growth Ponderosa Pine as well as Douglas Fir and aspen.  At the bottom of the trail near the lower trailhead there are several culturally scarred Ponderosa Pine trees that were utilized by the Ute Indians.  In addition the trail offers scenic vistas of Big Dominguez Creek and La Fair Creek and the impressive canyon walls.

Geo-Ref Trail Map   Geo-Reference Instructions

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Brice Creek Trailhead

Provides access to: Brice Creek Trail No. 1403 which follows Brice Creek for 5.7 miles. Brice Creek Trail is a popular hike that traverses a scenic canyon with numerous small waterfalls, pools, and rocky outposts, the last of which provide spaces for picnicking and sunbathing along the creek.

Brice Creek Trailhead

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Brown's Pass #369

The Brown’s Pass Trail #369 begins at the intersection with the Texas Creek Trail #416 in the Collegiate Peaks Wilderness at an elevation of 10,770 feet and ends at the Denny Creek Trailhead on the San Isabel National Forest.  The first 1.8 miles heads south from Texas Creek as ascends to Brown’s Pass at an elevation of 12,040 feet.  At the pass is becomes Brown’s Pass Trail #1442 as in passes into the San Isabel National Forest, Salida Ranger District, and continues to descend for another 3.6 miles to the Denny Creek Trailhead.  There are breathtaking views from the trail of Mt. Yale and the Collegiate Peaks.  There are numerous dispersed camping sites along the trail, especially on the south side of Brown’s Pass.  Trail Map

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Browns Canyon National Monument

Information coming soon!


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Brush Creek Connector #627

The Brush Creek Connector Trail #627 begins on Forest Service Road 736, Farris Creek Road, and ends at an intersection with FSR 738, Brush Creek Road and FSR 738.2B, East Brush Creek Road. This trail crosses 4 streams and has lots of ups and downs as it traverses the ridge above Brush Creek. It drops down into the Brush creek drainage and comes to an end where Brush Creek and East Brush Creek Roads converge.

Geo-Ref Trail Map   Geo-Reference Instructions

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Buffalo Pass

The Buffalo Pass area has been an increasingly popular dispersed recreation hub, partly because of its proximity to Steamboat Springs. The area, however, was lacking in Forest Service trails for people to enjoy the area, and many user created trails were developed instead. In response, in 2016, the Hahns Peak/Bears Ears Ranger District conducted an analysis of the potential effects of taking three different alternative actions: no action; closing all user created trails in the area; or constructing new trails and improving the user created trails. The resulting document, the Buffalo Pass Trails Project Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact, provided the necessary information for the District Ranger to make a decision on a course of action. The Final Decision Notice approved the alternative for the district to construct new trails and improve the user created trails in the area, for a total of approximately 43 miles of trail, as that supported the Forest Service management policy of providing for recreational opportunities while protecting resources. The decision also included the provision to prohibit bicycles and all other wheeled vehicles from riding off of designated trails and roads in the Buffalo Pass area.

Implementation of the project is now underway, with completion anticipated at the end of the 2018 summer season. Current trail status information is provided on this page and will be updated as more trails are completed.

The district is in the process of planning the next phase of trails in the Mad Creek, Rocky Peak, and Rabbit Ears areas. The tenative timeline is:

  • Winter 2017-2018: Informal scoping on potential alternatives.
  • Summer 2018: Field review of alternatives, as needed.
  • Early fall 2018: Draft environmetnal analysis available to the public for comments.
  • Late fall 2018: Final environmental analysis available.

If you are interested in being part of the process, please contact Kent Foster or the district office.

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Buffalo Pass

The Buffalo Pass area has been an increasingly popular dispersed recreation hub, partly because of its proximity to Steamboat Springs. The area, however, was lacking in Forest Service trails for people to enjoy the area, and many user created trails were developed instead. In response, in 2016, the Hahns Peak/Bears Ears Ranger District conducted an analysis of the potential effects of taking three different alternative actions: no action; closing all user created trails in the area; or constructing new trails and improving the user created trails. The resulting document, the Buffalo Pass Trails Project Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact, provided the necessary information for the District Ranger to make a decision on a course of action. The Final Decision Notice approved the alternative for the district to construct new trails and improve the user created trails in the area, for a total of approximately 43 miles of trail, as that supported the Forest Service management policy of providing for recreational opportunities while protecting resources. The decision also included the provision to prohibit bicycles and all other wheeled vehicles from riding off of designated trails and roads in the Buffalo Pass area.

Implementation of the project is now underway, with completion anticipated at the end of the 2018 summer season. Current trail status information is provided on this page and will be updated as more trails are completed.

The district is in the process of planning the next phase of trails in the Mad Creek, Rocky Peak, and Rabbit Ears areas. The tenative timeline is:

  • Winter 2017-2018: Informal scoping on potential alternatives.
  • Summer 2018: Field review of alternatives, as needed.
  • Early fall 2018: Draft environmetnal analysis available to the public for comments.
  • Late fall 2018: Final environmental analysis available.

If you are interested in being part of the process, please contact Kent Foster or the district office.

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Burnout Cnyn/Upper Electric Lake Scenic Byway Sign

 For a description of this site, please contact the Price Ranger District: 435-636-3500.

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Burnout Cnyn/Upper Electric Lake Scenic Byway Sign

 For a description of this site, please contact the Price Ranger District: 435-636-3500.

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Calpine Fire Lookout

Calpine is a forest fire lookout tower that was actively used every summer until 1975.  It is a three-story structure with external stairs.  The top room or observation cab is the only rental space available at this time.  Visitors renting the lookout will have spectacular views of the surrounding mountains, sunrises, sunsets and stargazing.

Calpine sits at an elevation of 5,980 feet, approximately 40 miles from Truckee, CA.  Visitors can drive directly to the tower in summer and ski or snowshoe to it in the winter.  The lookout does not have electricity or water.  In contains propane- powered appliances.   The interior of the cab measures 14' by 14' and currently has two twin beds, a dry sink, a table and chairs, three propane lights, a propane heater, a propane stove/oven and a fire finder.  A limited assortment of cooking utensils, pots and pans are provided.  An accessible vault toilet and a picnic table and fire ring are located outside the lookout. Firewood is not provided.  Visitors need to bring their own bedding, toilet paper and other personal items.

History

Towers such as Calpine lookout have been used for many years to spot forest fires. Calpine lookout was built in 1934 by the Civilian Conservation Corps. The structure consists of a ground floor storage room, a middle sleeping room and the observation cab on top.

Calpine lookout is an “L-7” or windmill style enclosed tower with a “BC-3” cab and has been determined to be eligible for the National Register of Historic Places. The windmill style of lookout was very popular throughout California, used by the Forest Service, California Department of Forestry and some counties. Calpine lookout is one of 3 windmill style lookouts that remain in the state.

Historically, active lookouts were staffed during fire season by one person trained to spot fires. Searching for fires is an all-day and sometimes all night, seven day per week job. Since 1975 Calpine lookout has had limited use, mostly during times of summer lightning activity.

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