Visit Destinations

Your national forests and grasslands are 193 million acres of vast, scenic beauty waiting for you to discover. Visitors who choose to recreate on these public lands find more than 150,000 miles of trails, 10,000 developed recreation sites, 57,000 miles of streams, 122 alpine ski areas, 338,000 heritage sites, and specially designated sites that include 9,100 miles of byways, 22 recreation areas, 11 scenic areas, 439 wilderness areas, 122 wild and scenic rivers, nine monuments, and one preserve. And remember, “It’s All Yours.”

Rec Area Description Status
ATV Bypass 05617

Access from Chamisoso Trailhead.

Please consult the  Manzanita Mountains Trail System Map

  • Cell phone coverage is not guaranteed
  • Be courteous to other users, motorized vehicles and bicycles yield to hikers and horses
  • It is the recreationist’s responsibility to know which trails are designated for motorized vehicles and to follow the guidelines
  • It is a multi-user area
  • Travel only on established trails
open
ATV Bypass 05617

Access from Chamisoso Trailhead.

Please consult the  Manzanita Mountains Trail System Map

  • Cell phone coverage is not guaranteed
  • Be courteous to other users, motorized vehicles and bicycles yield to hikers and horses
  • It is the recreationist’s responsibility to know which trails are designated for motorized vehicles and to follow the guidelines
  • It is a multi-user area
  • Travel only on established trails
open
ATV Bypass 05617

Access from Chamisoso Trailhead.

Please consult the  Manzanita Mountains Trail System Map

  • Cell phone coverage is not guaranteed
  • Be courteous to other users, motorized vehicles and bicycles yield to hikers and horses
  • It is the recreationist’s responsibility to know which trails are designated for motorized vehicles and to follow the guidelines
  • It is a multi-user area
  • Travel only on established trails
open
Baird Glacier

The Baird Glacier is located about 20 miles northeast of Petersburg, Alaska. It has a large glacial outwash plain and terminal moraine in front of the ice which supports a diversity of plant and animal life. The outwash plain developed over many decades of sand deposits due to floods and coastal uplift. The terminal moraine is a prominent, long mound of cobble, boulders and sand left behind when the glacier terminus rested there for many years. There are no recreation facilities such as cabins or shelters at the glacier, though other FS cabins such as Spurt Cove and Cascade Creek are nearby in Thomas Bay. Forest Service developed hiking opportunities in the area include Falls Lake and Swan Lake trails.

Baird Glacier Story Map - For more photos and information about the Baird Glacier click here.

Planning your trip – The Baird’s outwash plain and terminal moraine are part of a world class nature viewing site.  Baird Glacier flows into Thomas Bay which empties into Frederick Sound. As you enter the bay from Frederick Sound and head towards the far end of the bay, the steep granitic walls will become closer and surround you. They were smoothed by the Stikine Icefield including the Baird and nearby Patterson glacier, which scoured the surrounding rock and shaped the landscape. 

May through September are the best months to visit, although an individual will need to apply caution during the breeding period of the Arctic Tern from early May through August. Visitors coming to the area during this time period should avoid walking near areas where the birds are congregated and audibly warn intruders to stay away. Disturbance can not only cause nest abandonment, but tern eggs are laid directly on the ground and are very difficult to see! A suggested hiking route is provided in the map below for staying clear of the main nesting areas. 

Getting ThereThe Baird Glacier environs is accessible by boat from Petersburg.

The glacier environment is a dynamic landscape with cold water constantly moving, from cascading waterfalls to swift silty rivers. Visiting by boat can only be done within the confines of the tides, coming in just before the high and leaving before the tide starts to turn in a few hours. Visitors can also camp on the outwash plain in the areas of higher relief and be picked up the next day. Outfitter and guide boat operators based in Petersburg are familiar with these confines and will plan accordingly. If you are going in your own boat and not part of a guided tour, no special permit is needed.

Boats enter the channel along the outwash plain on an incoming tide, using a fathometer to measure depth within the shallow, cobble-ridden, silty water. Several locations are possible for disembarking from the boat, with a boulder studded sandy area to guide you to the main viewing areas. It takes about 20 minutes to hike from the boat to the glacier viewing area.

Visitors wanting to climb onto the Baird Glacier cannot access the ice from the terminal moraine any longer, as the 2015 flooding and rapid retreat has broken up the terminus. A lake is blocking foot access from the terminal moraine to the ice. Climbers must plan accordingly, using small pack rafts to paddle across the lake to the ice to reach the icefields’ multiple peaks.

open
Baltimore Lake

Baltimore Lake lies in a heavily timbered basin within the Grouse Ridge Non-Motorized Area. This lake supports a brook trout fishery through the planting of 1,500 fingerlings every other year. There are a number of good campsites and fishing is generally good. 

unknown
Basin View #618

Forest Trail #618 (Basin View Trail) is 0.8 miles long. It begins at Forest Trail #531 and ends at Forest Road #237. Forest Trail #618 is open for the following uses: hiking, horseback riding. This trail is part of the Continental Divide National Scenic Trail.

none
Bear Basin Butte Lookout and Pierson Cabin

Find solitude, awe-inspiring views, a quiet haven away from the crowd and the opportunity to feel what it’s like to live in a fire lookout. Experience it all at the top of Bear Basin Butte (elevation 5,303 feet) through the rental of a historic fire lookout and a new 1930s style cabin.


A Room with a View


Take in a panorama of the Siskiyou Crest to the east and rolling mountains to the west. Wisps of clouds and fingers of fog may move among the peaks and valleys, emphasizing the many contours of this striking landscape. Imagine watching a sunrise or sunset, stargazing, or even viewing an approaching storm from this magnificent vantage point! Try your hand at locating named peaks with the Osborne Firefinder, a device used in fire lookout towers.


The Facility and its Story


The lookout was originally built five miles west on French Hill at Camp Six by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1935.  Part of Forest Service fire detection operations through the 1990s, the lookout was moved in 1997 to Bear Basin Butte for recreational use. The cabin was built at that time.


A Botanical Area


The butte itself sits within the Bear Basin Butte Botanical Area, home to more than 14 species of conifers (cone-bearing trees) and an unusual and beautiful array of wildflowers and plants. All the better to try the Siskiyou Wilderness trailheads three miles from the lookout providing access to Buck Lake, Devil’s Punchbowl, Clear Creek Recreational Trail, and Island Lake. 


N/A
Bear Creek #635

The Bear Creek Trail #635 begins at the south end of Pine Street and is on the Town of Telluride’s Bear Creek Preserve and it ends at Bear Creek Falls about 0.2 miles past the intersection with the Wasatch Trail #508.  The trail follows a wide dirt track that heads up hill, climbing through an aspen and mixed conifer forest. After about 0.6 miles the trail enters Bear Creek Canyon and continues south following Bear Creek which is not visible from the trail.  There are spectacular views through openings in the trees of the cliffs and peaks in the surrounding area. At about 2 miles the trail intersects the Wasatch Trail #508. A combination of the Bear Creek Trail and the Wasatch Trail provides several loop routes. Continue for about another 0.2 miles to the trail ends at the base of beautiful Bear Creek Falls. The San Miguel Conservation Foundation, in partnership with the town of Telluride, acquired and donated a 320-acre parcel of land in the Bear Creek Canyon to the citizens of Telluride in 1995 to preserve Bear Creek as public open space.

none
Bear Pen Spur 1B #124.1B

The Bear Pen Spur 1B Trail #124.1B begins at Forest Service Road #500, Love Mesa Road, and ends at an intersection with the Bear Pen Gulch Trail #124. The trail descends into Bear Pen Gulch and heads east along the north side of a stream. After about 0.9 miles, it reaches FSR #500.4A, Bear Pen Gulch Road, and turn south crossing the stream, then heads northeast and crosses the stream again. It continues northeast/east until intersecting the Bear Pen Gulch Trail.

Geo-Ref Trail Map   Geo-Reference Instructions

none
Beartooth Front

This page covers camping and recreation options between Red Lodge Creek, westward to the West Fork of the Stillwater. This area is referred to as the Beartooth Front. Within this area, there are 5 locations that offer most of the options for recreation: Red Lodge Creek area, East Rosebud area, West Rosebud area, Benbow area, and the Stillwater River area.

This area is west of Red Lodge and is accessed by MT-Hwy 78 and MT-419. Some of these areas are used for access into the Absaroka-Beartooth Wildnerss. Be aware that travelling in the wilderness area comes with additional regulations.  For specific information and directions, including area trail maps, please access each of the locations:

none