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Your national forests and grasslands are 193 million acres of vast, scenic beauty waiting for you to discover. Visitors who choose to recreate on these public lands find more than 150,000 miles of trails, 10,000 developed recreation sites, 57,000 miles of streams, 122 alpine ski areas, 338,000 heritage sites, and specially designated sites that include 9,100 miles of byways, 22 recreation areas, 11 scenic areas, 439 wilderness areas, 122 wild and scenic rivers, nine monuments, and one preserve. And remember, “It’s All Yours.”

Rec Area Description Status
Cascade Falls River Access This access is located along the Salmon River Road and leads down to Cascade Falls, a Class IV rapid during spring rafting season. Perched above the falls, this access offers an excellent view of whitewater enthusiasts enjoying the river and access to swimming.
open
Cascade Head Picnic Area Coming Soon! A beautiful picnic area off the highway with visitor information about the Cascade Head Scenic Research Area.
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Castle Pass #441 The Castle Creek Trail #441 begins at the intersection with the Low Line Trail #438 and ends at the intersection with the Cliff Creek Trail #840.
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Castle Rock Jeep #881 The Castle Rock Jeep Trail #881 begins at an intersection with Forest Service Road #814, Virginia Creek Road, and ends at the end of FSR #814. This trail completes a loop at the end of the Virginia creek road system, and provides access to aspen and spruce forest along the lower reaches of Mendicant ridge. It is an overgrown two-track with brushy sides and can have fallen logs across it.  There is one creek crossing across Doug Creek and at least one deep rocky wash across the trail.  After about 0.3 miles there is a Spur Trail #881.1B that intersects the main trail and leads to dispersed camp sites. This spur can be brushy and muddy when wet.
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Castle Valley Ridge Trailhead This trailhead (TH) marks the beginning of the Castle Valley Ridge Trail.
open
Castle Valley Road Road along Castle Valley.  Provides access to Donner Lake Rim Trail, Hole in the Ground Trail, the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT), and the Peter Grub hut via Castle Pass and the PCT.
closed
Cave of the Bells The Cave of the Bells is a fascinating and fragile underground wilderness which exerts its strongest appeal on Forest visitors who enjoy cave exploration.  Though this subterranean gallery of rock, known for its unique and varied suite of minerals and formations, has been thousands of years in the forming, it is nevertheless extremely fragile.  A few moments of thoughtlessness here could cause immense amounts of damage.  For that reason, and because so many similar areas have been damaged by vandalism, the Cave of the Bells is locked and gated.  Keys are available (for a deposit) at the Forest Supervisor's Office in Tucson for those who wish to visit this unique area.
open
Cheoah River Area The Cheoah River, located near Robbinsville, NC, is a nine-mile section of waterway between the Santeetlah Dam and Lake Calderwood. Typical water flows average 250 cubic feet per second (cfs), but approximately 20 times per year Brookfield Renewable Resources, Inc. releases water from the dam to mimic natural flood events to benefit a variety of endangered and threatened species that live in the river ecosystem. A secondary benefit of these releases is the recreational opportunity created by the release of approximately 1000 cfs of water, resulting in a Class IV-V whitewater run while water is being released.
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Cherohala Skyway Area .
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Chetco River The Omnibus Oregon Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1988 designated 44.5 miles of the Chetco River as wild and scenic, from its headwaters in the Kalmiopsis Wilderness down to the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest boundary just above Loeb State Park. The designated segment of the Chetco is located within Curry County in southwest Oregon on the Chetco Ranger District.
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