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Your national forests and grasslands are 193 million acres of vast, scenic beauty waiting for you to discover. Visitors who choose to recreate on these public lands find more than 150,000 miles of trails, 10,000 developed recreation sites, 57,000 miles of streams, 122 alpine ski areas, 338,000 heritage sites, and specially designated sites that include 9,100 miles of byways, 22 recreation areas, 11 scenic areas, 439 wilderness areas, 122 wild and scenic rivers, nine monuments, and one preserve. And remember, “It’s All Yours.”

Rec Area Description Status
Big Bend Day Use From eastbound I-80, take Big Bend exit and continue east one-quarter mile to the day use area.  From westbound I-80, take the Rainbow Road exit and continue west for one and one-half mile to the day use area. Elevation:   5,900 Facilities:   3 picnic tables, 3 grills Potable water and vault toliets are available at the Big Bend Group Campground.
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Big Creek Landing Big Creek Landing, located on a high bank overlooking Black Creek Wild and Scenic River, serves as the northern terminus and beginning/end point for both the Black Creek float trip and the Black Creek Hiking Trail.  Here the stream ranges from 20 to 100 feet wide and, depending on the season and rainfall, 1 to 15 feet deep. Big Creek Landing is a small recreation area.  Facilities include one camping or picnicking site and a concrete boat launch.  Drinking water and sanitary facilities are not available. Big Creek Landing is open year-round unless weather conditions require the area to be closed. No user fees required
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Big Fat Gap Trailhead Big Fat Gap Trailhead – 3083 foot elevation.   The Big Fat Trail starts at the Big Fat Gap Trailhead, reached by a nine mile drive on the FSR # 62 Big Fat Gap Road, accessed from US Route 129 north of the Robbinsville area.  This  road is gated, and closed to the public from January 1 through  April 1 annually.
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Big Island Lake Wilderness Natural Surroundings Big Island Lake Wilderness is located centrally in Michigan's Upper Peninsula. White birch, maple and aspen cover the wooded hills that surround the lakes. Berries, mushrooms and wildflowers grow throughout the area. A wide range of wildlife and waterfowl, including sensitive species, may be observed but should not be disturbed. Link to Wilderness Map
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Bison Lake Road #640.1  Bison Lake Road is 4.2 miles. It is open to high clearnace vehicles, ovh, motorcycle, horse and foot traffic. Taking 640 makes a nice loop from #601.
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Black Creek Shooting Range The Black Creek Shooting Range offers a large backstop with targets ranging from 25, 50, and 100 yards.  Shooting bench available.  Open from sunrise to sunset, seven days a week.
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Black Creek Wilderness Area The Black Creek Wilderness was established in 1984 and contains slightly more than 5,000 acres.  The Black Wilderness is named after its dominant feature - Black Creek, which flows through its center.  The wilderness contains a segment of the Black Creek Wild and Scenic River and about 10 miles of the Black Creek National Recreation Trail. Black Creek bisects the wilderness, creating a large hardwood floodplain containing oxbow lakes and stands of sweetgum, loblolly pine, spruce pine, willow oak, bald cypress, sweetbay, and red maple. The terrain is fairly gentle, with elevations ranging from 100 to 270 feet above sea level.  The only development in this area is the Black Creek Trail.
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Black Dragon Trailhead The Black Dragon Trailhead marks the entrance to the Black Dragon Trail which is 1.8 miles long.  This trail provides a connection between the Ferron Canyon Picnic Area, which is adjacent to Forest Road 0022, and Forest Road 0170, which is south of Joes Valley.  The trailhead is at ~6480' elevation.
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Black Gulch South Dispersed Camping Black Gulch South is a dispersed camping or day use site on the Lower Kern River. There are vault toilets available and seasonal trash bins. Restrictions - No Camping or Campfires are allowed within 25 feet of the water’s edge
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Blanchard Springs Caverns Blanchard Springs Caverns is one of the most spectacular and carefully developed caves found anywhere.  Visitors enter a "living" cave where glistening formations like stalactites, stalagmites, columns, and flowstones are still changing.  These crystalline formations are the result of minerals deposited by dripping water.  Forest Service interpreters guide all tours. For more information about this natural wonder, check out the Blanchard Springs Caverns website.
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