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Your national forests and grasslands are 193 million acres of vast, scenic beauty waiting for you to discover. Visitors who choose to recreate on these public lands find more than 150,000 miles of trails, 10,000 developed recreation sites, 57,000 miles of streams, 122 alpine ski areas, 338,000 heritage sites, and specially designated sites that include 9,100 miles of byways, 22 recreation areas, 11 scenic areas, 439 wilderness areas, 122 wild and scenic rivers, nine monuments, and one preserve. And remember, “It’s All Yours.”

Rec Area Description Status
#1071 Rice Draw Rice Draw Trail #1071 traverses multiple closed roads as it climbs from the valley bottom near the town of Heron to a major ridgeline.  The trail receives very little use, with most use occurring in the hunting season. Rice Draw #1071
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#1077 Smeads Bench Smeads Bench Trail #1077 follows Smeads Creek up to Loveland Peak Trail #1070.The trail crosses Smeads Creek but the crossing is easily negotiated. Smeads Bench Trail #1077
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#1084 South Fork Pilgrim Creek South Fork Pilgrim Creek Trail #1084 travels from the Pilgrim Creek valley bottom and ends at the head end of the South Fork of Pilgrim Creek drainage on FSR 2710. Both the lower and upper trailhead are accessible by open Forest System road. The trail crosses the South Fork Pilgrim Creek just up the trail from the lower trailhead.  This crossing can be challenging and dangerous during peak flows. South Fork Pilgrim Creek #1084
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#881 Sims Creek Sims Creek Trail #881 is a short trail that connects into Libby Ranger District Himes/Walovine Trail #293. There are no stream crossings. Sims Creek Trail #881
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#892 West Fork Canyon Creek West Fork Canyon Creek Trail #892 follows an old road bed along Canyon Creek and then the West Fork of Canyon Creek.  The trail passes an old mining claim then steeply climbs to the ridgeline and Canyon Peak Trail #903.The trail crosses West Fork Canyon Creek multiple time.  These crossings can be challenging and dangerous during peak runoff.   (Be advised the trail departs from 20 Odd ATV Trail #896 at the .5 mile mark making this trail approximately 5.5 miles in length.) West Fork Canyon Creek Trail #892
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#894 Roe Gulch Roe Gulch Trail #894 departs from the 20 Odd ATV Trail #896 at approximately the 2.5 mile mark.  The trail climbs up to 20 Odd Peak (6048’).  20 Odd Peak Trail #898 and Canyon Peak Trail #903 depart from 20 Odd Peak offering loop hiking opportunities.  There are no stream crossings. (Be advised the trail departs from 20 Odd ATV Trail #896 at the 2.5 mile mark making this trail approximately 6 miles in length.) Roe Gulch Trail #894
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#999 Historic Big Eddy Historic Big Eddy Trail #999 is a short but steep non-motorized trail that ends at Big Eddy Trail #998 approximately halfway up to Star Peak.  The trail offers stunning views of the Clark Fork River Valley. Historic Big Eddy Trail #999
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45 Uinta Loop   Sorry! We have not entered information for this trail yet.   A trail description and map will be coming soon.  In the meantime, please contact the Cedar City Ranger District at (435) 865-3200 for information on this trail.  Thank you.   Map of Loop 4
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Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness: Shoshone The United States Congress designated the Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness in 1978 and it now has a total of 943,648 acres. Spanning the Montana-Wyoming border on the Shoshone, Gallatin, and Custer National Forests, the Absaroka Beartooth Wilderness is the juncture of two mountain ranges (Beartooth and Absaroka) with differing geologic types. The Absaroka Range (prounounced ab-ZORE-kuh, the Crow Indian word for crow) is of volcanic origin, while the Beartooth Range, named for a spike of rock resembling a bear's tooth, is granitic in formation.
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Accessing Rangeland There are thousands of acres of Forest Service managed rangeland available for visitors to explore on horseback or on foot in the Beckwourth Ranger District. This is public land, your land, and it is open for you to visit. Most visitors are concerned about barbed wire fences, closed gates and locating rangeland managed by the Forest Service. Hopefully the following information will ease those concerns and help you access these wonderful areas. How to determine Public Land from Private Property; 
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