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Verde River research and development program

Research Overview

The Upper Verde River on the Prescott National Forest has been home to over 20 years of research.
The Upper Verde River on the Prescott National Forest has been home to over 20 years of research.
The Southwest Watershed Science Team of the Rocky Mountain Station's Air, Water and Aquatic Environments Science Program, and the Team’s predecessor (Watersheds and Riparian Ecosystems of Forests and Woodlands in the Semi-Arid West), have been involved in research on the Upper Verde River since 1993. The result is comprehensive information about hydrology and ecology of this unique riparian ecosystem on the Prescott National Forest. Over 60 publications are associated with this work (see the Verde River bibliography below), as well as one of the most comprehensive riparian databases for any national forest in the Southwest. The objective of the Team's research has been the understanding of the physical, chemical and biological influences affecting native fauna and flora of this important river ecosystem. Current projects include fish monitoring, aquatic non-native predator removal, and invasive plant control and removal.

The Southwest Watershed Team and their cooperators, the Upper Verde River Adaptive Management Partnership, have provided up-to-date science to help guide the Prescott National Forest's land management decisions. This has been very valuable to the Forest in terms of foregone appeals and litigation, saving the Forest over $5 million. UVRAMP currently consists of the Prescott National Forest, the Rocky Mountain Research Station, and several grazing permittees from allotments along the river. Future expansion is bringing the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Arizona Game and Fish Department into the partnership. The partnership is open to any organization or agency interested in furthering the understanding of the Verde River ecosystem.

Verde River Bibliography

By Fiscal Year:    2012    2009    2008    2006    2005    2004    2003    2002    2001    2000    1999    1998    1997    1996   1995    1994    1993

2012

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2009

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2008

  • Johnson, T.D. 2008. Ecology and management of the tamarisk in the Southwest and on the upper Verde River, Arizona. MSc Thesis. Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona. 58 pp.

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2006

 

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2005

  • Rinne, J.N., L. Riley, R. Bettaso, K. Young, and R. Sorensen. 2004. Managing southwestern native and nonnative fishes: Can we mix oil and water and expect a favorable solution. Pp 117-138 in J. Nickum, M. Nickum, P. Muzik, and D. MacKinley (eds). Propagated Fishes in Resource Management. American Fisheries Society, Bethesda, Maryland.

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2004

  • Rinne, J.N. 2004. Forest, fish and fire: Relationships and management implications for fishes in the southwestern USA. Pp 151-156 in G.J. Scrimgeour, G. Eisler, B. McCullock, U. Silins, and M. Morita (eds.). Forest Lands - Fish II, Ecosystem Stewardship through Collaboration, Conference Proceedings. Edmonton, Alberta, 26-28 April 2004.

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2003

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2002

  • Rinne, J.N. 2001. Non-native, predatory fish removal and native fish response, Upper Verde River, Arizona: Preliminary results. Hydrology and Water Resources in Arizona and the Southwest, Issue 31: 29-35.

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2001

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2000

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1999

  • Rinne, J.N., and J.A. Stefferud. 1998. Verde River native fishes: The impacts of abiotic and biotic factors. Final Report for the Heritage Project 196002. USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, Colorado. 85 pp.

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1998

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1997

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1996

  • Rinne, J.N. 1996. Sky Island aquatic resources: Habitats and refugia for native fishes. Pp 351-360 in Biodiversity and Management of the Madrean Archipelago: The Sky Islands of Southwestern United States and Northwestern Mexico; 19-23 September 1994; Tucson, Arizona. General Technical Report RM-GTR-264. USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Fort Collins, Colorado.
  • Rinne, J.N.. 1996. Desired future conditions: Fish habitat in southwestern riparian stream habitats. Pp 336-345 in D.W. Shaw and D.M. Finch (tech. coords.). Desired Future Conditions for the Southwestern Riparian Ecosystems: Bringing Interest and Concerns Together; 18-22 September 1995; Albuquerque, New Mexico. General Technical Report RM-GTR-272. USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Fort Collins, Colorado.

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1995

  • Rinne, J.N. 1995. The Rio Grande cutthroat trout. Pp 24-27 in Conservation Assessment for Inland Cutthroat Trout. General Technical Report RM-GTR-256. USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Fort Collins, Colorado.
  • Rinne, J.N., and S.P. Platnaia. 1995. Fish fauna. Pp 165-174 in D.M. Finch and J.A. Tainter (comps.). Ecology, Diversity, and Sustainability of the Rio Grande Basin. USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Fort Collins, Colorado.
  • Rinne, J.N, and J. Janish. 1995. Cold water stocking and native fishes in Arizona: Past , present and future. Pp 397-406 in Proceedings of the International Symposium and Workshop on the Uses and Effects of Cultured Fishes and Aquatic Ecosystems; American Fisheries Society Symposium 15; 12-17 March 1994; Albuquerque, New Mexico. American Fisheries Society, Bethesda, Maryland.

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1994

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1993

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Go to the Southwest Watershed Science Team home page.