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Urban natural resources management

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Natural and anthropogenic processes are causing extensive and rapid ecological, social, and economic changes in arid and semiarid ecosystems worldwide. Nowhere are these changes more evident than in the Great Basin of the western United States, a region of 400,000 km2 that largely is managed by federal agencies.
Forest management will protect genetic integrity of tree species only if their genetic diversity is understood and considered in decision-making. Genetic knowledge is particularly important for species such as ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) that are distributed across wide geographic distances and types of climates.
Forest management will protect genetic integrity of tree species only if their genetic diversity is understood and considered in decision-making. Genetic knowledge is particularly important for species such as ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) that are distributed across wide geographic distances and types of climates.
Many areas throughout the United States are facing the triple threat of increasing fire severity, residential growth in areas prone to wildland fire, and suppression costs and losses. In addition, substantial changes are occurring in the way we plan and implement management on federal lands relative to use of wildland fire, prescribed fire, and mechanical fuel management.
Riparian vegetation buffer loss was investigated for three cities with contrasting local regulatory controls in urbanizing northwest Oregon. The cities examined were Hillsboro, Oregon City and Portland, all having experienced high rates of population increase in the 1990s. All cities are covered under Oregon’s land use law that provides goals for the protection of open space and natural resources.
Yellow toadflax is a short-lived perennial herb native to the steppes of southeastern Europe and southwestern Asia (Eurasia). This species spreads by both seeds and vegetative buds on its roots and creeping rhizomes (see Figure 1).
The National Coastal Assessment of the US EPA began field work in the Western US in 1999-2000. Probabilistic sampling for biotic and abiotic condition indicators was conducted at 381 stations within estuaries and coastal embayments of Washington, Oregon and California. In 2002, intertidal and low salt marsh habitats were sampled at an additional 190 stations.
Although Australia and New Zealand have quite different fire climates and fuels, the common understanding of fire behaviour underlies many facets of fire management in both countries. Fire management is the legal responsibility of various government land management agencies that manage public lands and individuals, local governments or corporations that manage private land.
Saltcedar (Tamarix spp.) is a major invasive weed found throughout the Western United States and Mexico. Introduced into North America in the 1800s, this shrub to small tree, now infests many riparian areas where it displaces native vegetation, increases fire hazards, uses extensive amounts of water, increases flooding during high water events and thus has caused extensive damage to urban, agricultural and natural areas.
Tamarisk is a woody invasive weed of riparian areas which has galvanized an amazing array of scientists, politicians, ranchers, farmers, tribal people, and many other interested parties because of its devastating impacts on natural ecosystems and valuable water ways in the west. Rarely has a single plant become such a catalyst for so many people to use as a “poster child” for a variety of interesting issues.

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