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Social values, ethics

Science Spotlights

Findings from this project help resource specialists explore the potential impacts of declining hunting participation, identify regions and activities experiencing the greatest decline, anticipate changes to communities dependent on wildlife-associated recreation, and consider new mechanisms to fund wildlife management. 
Rocky Mountain Research Station scientists affiliated with the National Fire Decision Support Center worked closely with the Agency's Western and Eastern Threat Centers to develop novel methods to assess wildfire risk to communities, watersheds, and wildlife habitat, and to developed, natural, and cultural resources. 
Habitat suitability models provide critical information needed for forest management plans to accommodate biodiversity conservation. We are developing GIS-based application tools for forest managers that requires minimal technical expertise to create habitat maps.
Bark-peeled ponderosa pine
Native peoples throughout the northern hemisphere have made use of the nutritious inner bark of pine trees.  Bark-peeling creates distinctive scars on trees, a permanent indicator of this cultural modification.  Like any historical artifact, laws and regulations protect these culturally modified trees (CMTs). 

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