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Hydrology, watersheds, sedimentation

Tools

ERMit is a web application which models erosion on current or proposed forest road. ERMiT allows users to predict the probability of a given amount of sediment delivery from the base of a hillslope following variable burns on forest, rangeland, and chaparral conditions in each of five years following wildfire. The model also predicts the effectiveness of sediment mitigation methods following a wildfire, such as applying mulch or seeding.
Tahoe Basin interface is a customized version of Disturbed WEPP that contains Tahoe-specific soils. It predicts not only runoff and erosion, but also delivery of phosphorus and fine sediment, something of particular concern in the Tahoe Basin.
The Forest Service Peak Flow Calculator predicts peak flood flow rate for a given storm from a small watershed. The model uses Curve Number technology given precipitation and runoff, as from ERMiT, plus other parameters.
The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) is a computer simulation that predicts soil erosion.  This particular version of the tool predicts soil erosion for the Great Lakes watershed.
VAR stands for Values-at-Risk. The VAR Calculation Tool aids with assessing post-fire values-at-risk, including but not limited to human life and safety, infrastructure damage, and environmental effects.
Disturbed WEPP is a web application which allows users easily to describe numerous disturbed forest and rangeland erosion conditions. The interface presents the probability of a given level of erosion occurring the year following a disturbance. Version 2.0 needs no vegetation calibration.
WEPP:Road predicts the annual average erosion from insloped or outsloped forest roads and predicts the amount of sediment that will leave the buffer.
Thermal regimes are important to aquatic ecosystems because they strongly dictate species distributions, productivity, and abundance. Inexpensive digital temperature loggers, geographic information systems (GIS), remote sensing technologies, and new spatial analyses are facilitating the development of temperature models and monitoring networks applicable at broad spatial scales. This web site provides a mapping tool to help those in the western U.S.
The Geomorphic Road Analysis and Inventory Package (GRAIP) is a comprehensive free road inventory and modeling tool used to analyze the hydrogeomorphic impacts of roads on forested watersheds and to help land managers efficiently evaluate the multiple aspects of risk created by forest roads.
NorWeST aggregates stream temperature data from the Northwestern U.S. into a stream temperature database, and uses the data to develop stream temperature models.

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