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Science Spotlights

The Rocky Mountain Research Station is a partner in helping to protect or restore relationships between residents of the Flathead Indian Reservation and the Mission Mountain landscape.
The Rocky Mountain Research Station, in partnership with the Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) of Montana, and the University of Leeds, UK, are working together to protect or restore relationships between residents of the Flathead Indian Reservation and the Mission Mountain landscape within the reservation.
RNGR specialists provide necessary on-site support to nursery managers to improve production of native plants for reforestation and restoration.
The Reforestation, Nurseries, and Genetic Resources (RNGR) Team, established through a Forest Service memorandum of understanding, is tasked with transferring information on native plants, including their collection, propagation, and deployment. One issue the team addresses is ensuring that nursery managers, reforestation and restoration specialists, and others in related fields receive timely information.
Forest operations on the Kaibab National Forest, Arizona.
A notable management challenge with implementing this strategy is the lack of information regarding costs of different forest restoration treatments. This research project is using empirical economic models developed in cooperation with forest managers and logging contractors to estimate the costs of achieving forest restoration objectives using a range of logging equipment.
The San Francisco Peaks in northern Arizona are sacred to many Native American groups.
In August 2010, the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) and the Rocky Mountain Research Station began a collaborative project focused on tribal climate change issues in the Southwest. Project collaborators are coordinating with the Pacific Northwest and Northern Research Stations as part of the Agency's 2010 Coordinated Approach to Tribal Climate Change research project.
Species like the European Starling (top, photo courtesy of Cephas/Creative Commons) thrive with human settlement.
Housing development has been particularly strong near protected lands because many people see these environments as desirable places to live. This study documented the trends in new home construction near protected lands and explored if this housing development impacted biodiversity of avian species within protected areas.
The “Human-Side of Restoration Webinar Series” was launched in 2014 as a collaboration among the Rocky Mountain Research Station, National Forest Foundation and the Colorado Forest Restoration Institute at Colorado State University. The series of seven webinars provided a forum for managers and social scientists to share insights and experiences with the “human side” of restoration, including the interface among ecological restoration, human...