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Climate Change

Projects

This project seeks to improve understanding of social vulnerability and adaptive capacity at the community and landscape scales and evaluate collaborative scenario-building exercises as a method for encouraging multi-stakeholder learning and adaptation planning.
The Fire Effects Information System (FEIS) provides scientific information for resource management, restoration, rehabilitation, and fire management. FEIS continues to improve its service to managers by providing new and updated products and a new user interface is currently under development.
Great Basin bristlecone pine (GBBP) (Pinus longaeva) is a long-lived species found at high elevations in Utah, Nevada, and southeastern California (CA). 'Methuselah', a GBBP found in the White Mountains, CA, is the oldest known living non-clonal organism. Foxtail pine (FTP) (P.
The focus of this project is on climate change vulnerability and adaptive capacity. It evaluates collaborative scenario building to investigate landscape-scale decisionmaking under uncertainty.
The aquatics synthesis project aimed to improve access and application of relevant climate change data for aquatic resource managers and researchers. The Southern Rockies Landscape Conservation Cooperative, recognizing the need for syntheses and tools for climate change adaptation, sponsored this effort.
This research seeks to collect, identify, describe, and classify species of long-legged flies (Dolichopodidae), an important and diverse group of insects. 
Rocky Mountain Research Station scientists and collaborators are working to determine how bark beetle attacks change the moisture and chemistry of several tree species and how these changes affect flammability. Findings will allow us to improve fire behavior and risk models to better predict and manage wildfires and protect property and human life. 
Wet meadow ecosystems host threatened and endangered species and are at high risk from climate change, wildfires, and water diversion. A typical wet meadow in the upper Middle Fork Salmon River, Idaho is the site of several prior and current investigations of stream ecosystem dynamics.
Stem initiation of key mixed-grass prairie species will be examined under a range of temperature, clipping, and moisture treatments in a series of growth chamber and greenhouse experiments. 
The climate niche for Wyoming big sagebrush was model for contemporary and 2050 climate. Climate change is predicted to have a negative impact on this subspecies with a 39% reduction in climate niche space between now and 2050.

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