You are here

Assessments

Science Spotlights

Riparian habitat along the Rio Grande, New Mexico
Rocky Mountain Research Station scientists have developed a coupled approach that combines species distribution models, predictions for future fire regime, and climate change vulnerability assessments to estimate the interactive impacts of climate change and fire on species that reside within riparian habitats in the Southwest.
Predictions of future climates include higher flows in mountain streams during mid-winter; a time when salmon eggs are incubating in streambed gravels. Unique stream bathymetry data and high resolution hydrodynamic models allow us to quantitatively assess the risk of bed scour and egg nest destruction in low gradient mountain streams during a variety of flows.
Example of high-resolution LiDar data of canopy heights.
Airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technology uses lasers mounted on aircraft to image the 3-D structure of trees and other objects on the ground. RMRS Research Forester Andrew Hudak and others are developing relationships between LiDAR estimates and traditional forestry measures collected on the ground to develop maps of forest biomass and predict changes over time. Managers can benefit from this precise, spatially explicit...
A recently implemented science-based ponderosa pine restoration treatment site on the Pike National Forest near Manitou Experimental Forest (photo by Mike A Battaglia).
The Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program provides data for monitoring forest biomass at state, regional, and national scales. In 2000, the FIA program shifted from a periodic inventory to an annual inventory. Our study illustrated the effect of comparing population estimates from the old periodic inventories with population estimates from annual inventory plots, versus comparing only plots that were measured during both periodic and...

Pages