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Recent Publications

Social science offers rich descriptions of relationships between wildland-urban interface residents and wildfire, but syntheses across different contexts might gloss over important differences. We investigate the potential extent of such differences using data collected consistently in sixty-eight Colorado communities and hierarchical modeling.
The Sky Islands of southeastern Arizona, which consist of separate mountain ranges within a desert matrix, are a unique biodiversity hotspot hosting many neotropical bird species that cannot be seen anywhere else in the United States Residents of this region depend on ecotourism for their livelihood and there is an above-average concentration of citizens skilled at identifying birds by sight and sound.
The new eDNAtlas website and dynamic database allows land managers, scientists and the public to access results from environmental DNA (eDNA) collected from aquatic systems throughout the United States.
It is widely recognized that biotic interactions may act as important mediators of species responses to climate change. However, collecting the abiotic and biotic covariates at the resolution and extent needed to reveal these interactions from species distribution models is often prohibitively expensive and labor-intensive.
Environmental DNA (eDNA) sampling - the detection of genetic material in the environment to infer species presence - has rapidly grown as a tool for sampling aquatic animal communities. A potentially powerful feature of environmental sampling is that all taxa within the habitat shed DNA and so may be detectable, creating opportunity for whole‐community assessments.
The majority of environmental DNA (eDNA) assays for vertebrate species are based on commonly analyzed regions of the mitochondrial genome. However, the high degree of mitochondrial similarity between two species of charr (Salvelinus spp.), southern Dolly Varden (S. malma lordii) and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), precludes the development of a mitochondrial eDNA assay to distinguish them.
Beginning in the late 1990s, the pine forests of Montana began to experience the largest mountain pine beetle outbreak in recorded history. Large swaths of forests began to turn red, then gray as the beetles ate their way through Pacific Northwest stands. At their peak in 2009, this native insect infested nearly 3.7 million acres statewide, leaving dead or dying trees in their wake.
The United States Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program has been monitoring national forest resources in the United States for over 80 years; presented here is a synthesis of research applications for FIA data. A review of over 180 publications that directly utilize FIA data is broken down into broad categories of application and further organized by methodologies and niche research areas.
This chapter describes the ecology of important disturbance regimes in the Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USFS) Northern Region and the Greater Yellowstone Area, hereafter called the Northern Rockies region, and potential shifts in these regimes as a consequence of observed and projected climate change.
Structurally diverse forests provide resilience to an array of disturbances and are a mainstay of multiple-resource management. Silviculture based on natural disturbance can increase structural heterogeneity while providing other ecological and economic benefits.

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