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Recent Publications

Monitoring understory plant diversity is important, allowing managers to track current diversity status and trends both spatially and temporally at a landscape-scale. Improving precision in quantifying patterns in understory plant diversity improves efficiency in monitoring design and more accurate measures of success of management intervention over time.
Pedogenic processes imprint their signature on soils over the course of thousands to millions of years in most soil systems. Variation in soil forming processes - such as parent material weathering, organic material additions, hydrologic processes, and atmospheric additions - account for the distribution and sourcing of cations in ecosystems, and hence exert a strong influence on ecosystem productivity.
The U.S. Forest Service has a long, rich history of helping to steward the nation's fish and aquatic resources and contributing to the broader fish and aquatic conservation and scientific community in the United States and worldwide. The agency recently updated its national strategy for fish and aquatic resource stewardship.
This report describes modeling of historical range of variability and alternative management scenarios in the upper Yuba River watershed, Tahoe National Forest, California. We discuss the need for this study with respect to the historical and contemporary context of the northern Sierra Nevada landscape, including background on the range of variability concept and the use of simulation modeling to quantify it.
Terrestrial gastropods are part of one of the most vulnerable taxonomic groups, mollusks, but receive relatively little conservation attention. This is partially due to the paucity of peer-reviewed statistical evaluations of common survey techniques.
Restoring overstocked forests by thinning and pyrolyzing residual biomass produces biochar and other value‐added products. Forest soils amended with biochar have potential to sequester carbon (C), improve soil quality, and alter greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without depleting nutrient stocks. Yet, few studies have examined the effects of biochar on GHG emissions and tree growth in temperate forest soils.
Climate-tree growth relationships recorded in annual growth rings have recently been the basis for projecting climate change impacts on forests. However, most trees and sample sites represented in the International Tree-Ring Data Bank (ITRDB) were chosen to maximize climate signal and are characterized by marginal growing conditions not representative of the larger forest ecosystem.
It seems as though dire predictions of U.S. forest decline continue to roll off the presses. Even the Nation’s forest census, the USDA Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program, has measured elevated levels of tree mortality in many forest types - mostly as a result of fires, drought, and insect outbreaks. However, in contrast to these indicators of decline, the FIA program also shows substantial regeneration and regrowth.
Laboratory and field experiments focused on pyrolysis and ignition coupled with sufficient description of fuel characteristics and physics-based modeling are being used to improve our understanding of combustion processes in mixed (heterogeneous) fuel beds managed with prescribed fire in the southern United States.
This field guide is a tool for the identification of 119 common forbs found in the sagebrush rangelands and grasslands of the northern Great Basin. These forbs are important because they are either browsed directly by Greater Sage-grouse or support invertebrates that are also consumed by the birds. Species are arranged alphabetically by genus and species within families.

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