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Whitebark pine direct seeding trials in the Pacific Northwest

Posted date: July 05, 2011
Publication Year: 
2011
Authors: Schwandt, John; Chadwick, Kristen; Kearns, Holly; Jensen, Chris
Publication Series: 
Proceedings (P)
Source: In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 357-361.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) is a critical species in many high elevation ecosystems and is currently in serious decline due to white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola), mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), and competition from other species (Schwandt 2006; Tomback and Achuff 2010; Tomback and others 2001). Many areas needing restoration are very remote or in areas where the planting of seedlings may not be logistically or politically feasible. Consequently, it is important to determine if direct planting of seeds is practicable and which treatments enhance germination and chances of survival.

Citation

Schwandt, John; Chadwick, Kristen; Kearns, Holly; Jensen, Chris. 2011. Whitebark pine direct seeding trials in the Pacific Northwest. In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 357-361.