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Using GIS technology to analyze and understand wet meadow ecosystems

Posted date: August 06, 2010
Publication Year: 
1999
Authors: Rosen, Joy; Jemison, Roy; Pawelek, David; Neary, Daniel G.
Publication Series: 
Proceedings (P)
Source: In: Finch, Deborah M.; Whitney, Jeffrey C.; Kelly, Jeffrey, F.; Loftin, Samuel R. Rio Grande ecosystems: linking land, water, and people: Toward a sustainable future for the Middle Rio Grande Basin. 1998 June 2-5; Albuquerque, NM. Proc. RMRS-P-7. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 175-179.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

A Cibola National Forest wet meadow restoration was implemented as part of the Forest Road 49 enhancement near Grants, New Mexico. An Arc/View 3.0 Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to track the recovery of this ecosystem. Layers on topography, hydrology, vegetation, soils and human alterations were compiled using a GPS and commonly available data. Cartographic information allows visual interaction of natural features that could not be interpreted from tabular data sets. First results indicate that stream confinements by the railroad trestle, old channel fill, old two-track roads, Forest Road 49, and mis-graded construction affected the flow and location of spring floodwaters in 1998.

Citation

Rosen, Joy; Jemison, Roy; Pawelek, David; Neary, Daniel. 1999. Using GIS technology to analyze and understand wet meadow ecosystems. In: Finch, Deborah M.; Whitney, Jeffrey C.; Kelly, Jeffrey, F.; Loftin, Samuel R. Rio Grande ecosystems: linking land, water, and people: Toward a sustainable future for the Middle Rio Grande Basin. 1998 June 2-5; Albuquerque, NM. Proc. RMRS-P-7. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 175-179.