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Use of FVS for a forest-wide inventory on the Spokane Indian Reservation

Posted date: October 01, 2008
Publication Year: 
2008
Authors: Hensold, Ted
Publication Series: 
Proceedings (P)
Source: In: Havis, Robert N.; Crookston, Nicholas L., comps. 2008. Third Forest Vegetation Simulator Conference; 2007 February 13–15; Fort Collins, CO. Proceedings RMRS-P-54. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 98-115
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

The Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) was used with Continuous Forest Inventory (CFI) data on the Spokane Indian Reservation to provide predicted yields over a 100-year period for 994 1/5 acre plots. The plots were grouped into five strata based on habitat type groupings, projected separately, and the stratum results were combined after processing. Results from the projections provided information which was useful in management planning. Problems with the unbalanced age-class distribution of the forest were shown to be largely compensated for by differing rates of the development among the different strata. Although stocking levels and harvest yields within most strata fluctuated over time, the variations of forest-wide averages were considerably smoother. The results also predicted which components of the forest would likely suffer the highest rates of mortality in the near-term, and should receive more management attention. At the outset, this study also sought to test several differing options for management, such as precommercial thinning, regeneration density, and type of regeneration. However, FVS only demonstrated a difference in yields in the last case.

Citation

Hensold, Ted 2008. Use of FVS for a forest-wide inventory on the Spokane Indian Reservation. In: Havis, Robert N.; Crookston, Nicholas L., comps. 2008. Third Forest Vegetation Simulator Conference; 2007 February 13–15; Fort Collins, CO. Proceedings RMRS-P-54. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 98-115