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Toward a defensible lynx conservation strategy: A framework for planning in the face of uncertainty [Chapter 1]

Posted date: March 26, 2016
Publication Year: 
2000
Authors: Ruggiero, Leonard F.; McKelvey, Kevin S.
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Ruggiero, Leonard F.; Aubry, Keith B.; Buskirk, Steven W.; Koehler, Gary M.; Krebs, Charles J.; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Squires, John R. Ecology and conservation of lynx in the United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-30WWW. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 5-20.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

On April 2, 1993, the incumbent U.S. President traveled to Portland, Oregon, to intervene in a national political crisis engendered by public concern over the conservation of native wildlife on public lands. Environmentalists had successfully used existing statutes, most notably the National Forest Management Act and pursuant regulations, to shut down timber industry operations on commercially important federal lands in the Pacific Northwest. Widespread economic dislocations were expected, and the federal courts showed no signs of reversing the decision to suspend timber-harvesting activities. At the core of this enormously divisive legal controversy was the effect of timber management on the viability of northern spotted owl populations - an issue that arguably defined one of the most significant conservation conflicts of this century.

Citation

Ruggiero, Leonard F.; McKelvey, Kevin S. 2000. Toward a defensible lynx conservation strategy: A framework for planning in the face of uncertainty [Chapter 1]. In: Ruggiero, Leonard F.; Aubry, Keith B.; Buskirk, Steven W.; Koehler, Gary M.; Krebs, Charles J.; McKelvey, Kevin S.; Squires, John R. Ecology and conservation of lynx in the United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-30WWW. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 5-20.