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Sustaining wildlife populations in productively managed forests

Posted date: April 16, 2019
Publication Year: 
2003
Authors: Bevers, Michael; Flather, Curtis H.; Hof, John; Kaiser, H. Fred
Publication Series: 
Book Chapter
Source: In: Arthaud, G. J.; Barrett, T. M., eds. Systems analysis in forest resources: Proceedings of the Eighth Symposium; Sept. 27-30, 2000; Snowmass Village, Colorado, USA. Boston, MA: Kluwer Academic Publishers. p. 225-242.

Abstract

Wildlife population status is becoming a key consideration in determining whether wood fiber production from managed forests can be sustained. Concerns for wildlife have become a very important part of public land management in many areas of the world and are being given increased weight on privately owned lands. Jointly maintaining wood fiber production and wildlife populations requires an ability to spatially and temporally design management activities so as to mitigate negative impacts on wildlife habitat. Consequently, research efforts that blend wildlife population persistence modeling with tradition al forest management modeling can potentially playa crucial role in maintaining future forest productivity. In this chapter, we synthesize recent and ongoing research combining population reaction-diffusion models with spatial forest management optimization methods for planning the location, timing, and intensity of harvests to simultaneously sustain wildlife and wood fiber production.

Citation

Bevers, Michael; Flather, Curtis H.; Hof, John; Kaiser, H. Fred. 2003. Sustaining wildlife populations in productively managed forests. In: Arthaud, G. J.; Barrett, T. M., eds. Systems analysis in forest resources: Proceedings of the Eighth Symposium; Sept. 27-30, 2000; Snowmass Village, Colorado, USA. Boston, MA: Kluwer Academic Publishers. p. 225-242.