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Strategies, tools, and challenges for sustaining and restoring high elevation five-needle white pine forests in western North America

Posted date: July 05, 2011
Publication Year: 
2011
Publication Series: 
Proceedings (P)
Source: In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 276-294.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Many ecologically important, five-needle white pine forests that historically dominated the high elevation landscapes of western North America are now being heavily impacted by mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus spp.) outbreaks, the exotic disease white pine blister rust (WPBR), and altered high elevation fire regimes. Management intervention using specially designed strategic treatments will be needed to conserve these keystone species. The goal of this intervention is to promote self-sustaining five-needle white pine ecosystems that have both resilience to disturbances and genetic resistance to white pine blister rust. Many tools and methods are available for land managers. In this paper we outline important steps for implementation of restoration treatments in declining high elevation white pine stands and discuss a number of proactive treatments in threatened ecosystems to mitigate adverse impacts of rust, beetles, and lack of fire.

Citation

Keane, Robert E.; Schoettle, Anna W. 2011. Strategies, tools, and challenges for sustaining and restoring high elevation five-needle white pine forests in western North America. In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 276-294.