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Species of conservation concern and environmental stressors: Local regional and global effects [Chapter 6]

Posted date: September 09, 2013
Publication Year: 
2013
Authors: Ostoja, Steven M.; Brooks, Mathew L.; Chambers, Jeanne C.Pendleton, Burton K.
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Chambers, Jeanne C.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Pendleton, Burton K.; Raish, Carol B., eds. The Southern Nevada Agency Partnership Science and Research Synthesis: Science to support land management in Southern Nevada. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-303. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 97-124.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Species conservation has traditionally been based on individual species within the context of their requisite habitat, which is generally defined as the communities and ecosystems deemed necessary for their persistence. Conservation decisions are hampered by the fact that environmental stressors that potentially threaten the persistence of species can operate at organizational levels larger than the habitat or home range of a focal species. Resource managers must therefore simultaneously consider local, regional, and/or global scale stressors for effective conservation and management of species of concern.

Citation

Ostoja, Steven M.; Brooks, Mathew L.; Chambers, Jeanne C.; Pendleton, Burton K. 2013. Species of conservation concern and environmental stressors: Local regional and global effects [Chapter 6]. In: Chambers, Jeanne C.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Pendleton, Burton K.; Raish, Carol B., eds. The Southern Nevada Agency Partnership Science and Research Synthesis: Science to support land management in Southern Nevada. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-303. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 97-124.