You are here

Soil properties associated with various stages of succession in the aspen ecosystem

Posted date: March 28, 2013
Publication Year: 
1997
Authors: Amacher, Michael C.; Bartos, Dale L.
Publication Series: 
Abstract
Source: In: Abstracts: 50th Annual Meeting of the Society for Range Management; Rapid City, South Dakota; February 16-21, 1997. Denver, CO: Society for Range Management. p. 16.

Abstract

In the Interior west, if current conditions continue (e.g., lack of fire, wildlife use, grazing by livestock, natural succession) that have prevailed for the past 100 to 140 years, most aspen stands will eventually be replaced by conifers, sagebrush, or possibly tall shrub communities. Current estimates are there has beeh a 60% decrease in aspen dominated lands since the arrival of European man. This decrease is persistent across the entire state of Utah and probably holds true for most of the Interior West. This loss of aspen from the landscape translates to a loss of water, forage, and biodiversity.

Citation

Amacher, Michael C.; Bartos, Dale L. 1997. Soil properties associated with various stages of succession in the aspen ecosystem. In: Abstracts: 50th Annual Meeting of the Society for Range Management; Rapid City, South Dakota; February 16-21, 1997. Denver, CO: Society for Range Management. p. 16.