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The role of wildfire in the establishment and range expansion of nonnative plant species into natural areas: A review of current literature

Posted date: July 19, 2007
Publication Year: 
2006
Authors: Johnson, Mara; Rew, Lisa J.; Maxwell, Bruce D.; Sutherland, Steve
Publication Series: 
Miscellaneous Publication
Source: Bozeman, MT: Montana State University Center for Invasive Plant Management. 80 p.

Abstract

Nonnative invasive plants are one of the greatest threats to natural ecosystems worldwide (Vitousek et al. 1996). In fact, their spread has been described as "a raging biological wildfire" (Dewey et al. 1995). Disturbances tend to create conditions that are favorable for germination and establishment of plant species. Nonnative plant species are often characterized as weeds, exotics, and invasives that can exploit such conditions (Rejmánek 1996) and many of them possess traits such as rapid germination, high fecundity, and effective means of seed dispersal (Stohlgren et al. 1998).

Citation

Johnson, Mara; Rew, Lisa J.; Maxwell, Bruce D.; Sutherland, Steve 2006. The role of wildfire in the establishment and range expansion of nonnative plant species into natural areas: A review of current literature. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University Center for Invasive Plant Management. 80 p.