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Restoration of whitebark pine forests in the northern Rocky Mountains, USA

Posted date: July 05, 2011
Publication Year: 
2011
Publication Series: 
Proceedings (P)
Source: In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 338-347.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) has been declining across much of its range in North America because of the combined effects of mountain pine beetle epidemics, fire exclusion policies, and widespread exotic blister rust infections. Whitebark pine seed is dispersed by a bird, the Clark's nutcracker, which caches seed in open, pattern-rich landscapes created by fire. This study was initiated in 1993 to investigate the effects of various restoration treatments on tree populations, fuel dynamics, and vascular plant cover on five sites in the U.S. northern Rocky Mountains. The objective of this study was to restore whitebark pine ecosystems using treatments that emulate the native fire regime - primarily combinations of prescribed fire, silvicultural cuttings, and fuel enhancement cuttings.

Citation

Keane, Robert E. 2011. Restoration of whitebark pine forests in the northern Rocky Mountains, USA. In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 338-347.