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Removing the tree-ring width biological trend using expected basal area increment

Posted date: March 25, 2009
Publication Year: 
2008
Authors: Biondi, Franco; Qeadan, Fares
Publication Series: 
Proceedings (P)
Source: In: Olberding, Susan D., and Moore, Margaret M., tech. coords. Fort Valley Experimental Forest-A Century of Research 1908-2008. Conference Proceedings; August 7-9, 2008; Flagstaff, AZ. Proc. RMRS-P-55. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 124-131
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

One of the main elements of dendrochronological standardization is the removal of the biological trend, i.e., the progressive decline of ring width along a cross-sectional radius that is mostly caused by the corresponding increase in stem diameter over time. A very common option for removing this biological trend is to fit a modified negative exponential curve to the ring-width measurements. Because this method has numerical and conceptual drawbacks, we propose an alternative way based on a simple assumption, namely that a constant basal area increment is distributed over a growing surface. We then derive a mathematical expression for the biological trend, which can be easily calculated and used for dendrochronological standardization. In turn, this "C-method" provides an empirical test of existing theories on life-long progression of tree basal area increment. The proposed method was applied to tree-ring records from ponderosa pines (Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex P.Lawson & C.Lawson) located at the G. A. Pearson Natural Area in northern Arizona, U.S.A. Master ring-index chronologies built with the C-method reproduced stand-wide patterns of tree growth, and are therefore preferable for ecological applications. Other advantages of the C-method are that it is theoretically derived, it is applicable to individual series, and it does not require fitting a growth curve using nonlinear regression.

Citation

Biondi, Franco; Qeadan, Fares 2008. Removing the tree-ring width biological trend using expected basal area increment. In: Olberding, Susan D., and Moore, Margaret M., tech. coords. Fort Valley Experimental Forest-A Century of Research 1908-2008. Conference Proceedings; August 7-9, 2008; Flagstaff, AZ. Proc. RMRS-P-55. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 124-131