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Reburns and their Impact on carbon pools, site productivity, and recovery [Chapter 13]

Posted date: June 23, 2016
Publication Year: 
2015
Authors: Page-Dumroese, Deborah S.Jain, Terrie B.Sandquist, JonathanTirocke, Joanne M.; Errecart, John; Jurgensen, Martin F.
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Potter, Kevin M.; Conkling, Barbara L., eds. Forest Health Monitoring: National status, trends, and analysis 2014. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-209. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. p. 143-149.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Prior to fire suppression and exclusion, wildfires and other disturbances (e.g., insects, disease, and weather) sustained ecosystem processes in many landscapes of the Western United States. However, wildfires have been increasing in size, frequency, and intensity in recent years (Kellogg and others 2008). Recognizing the value of wildfire, scientists and land managers now promote allowing non- human-caused fires to burn in these landscapes, hoping fire can recreate the historical distribution and mosaic of presettlement, burned forests.

Citation

Page-Dumroese, Deborah S.; Jain, Theresa B.; Sandquist, Jonathan E.; Tirocke, Joanne M.; Errecart, John; Jurgensen, Martin F. 2015. Reburns and their Impact on carbon pools, site productivity, and recovery [Chapter 13]. In: Potter, Kevin M.; Conkling, Barbara L., eds. Forest Health Monitoring: National status, trends, and analysis 2014. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-209. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Southern Research Station. p. 143-149.