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Re-measurement of whitebark pine infection and mortality in the Canadian Rockies

Posted date: July 01, 2011
Publication Year: 
2011
Authors: Smith, Cyndi M.; Shepherd, Brenda; Gillies, Cameron; Stuart-Smith, Jon
Publication Series: 
Proceedings (P)
Source: In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 238-241.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) populations are under threat across the species' range from white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola), mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), fire exclusion and climate change (Tomback and Achuff 2010). Loss of whitebark pine is predicted to have cascading effects on the following ecological services: provision of high-energy food for wildlife (Tomback and Kendall 2001), facilitation of succession (Callaway 1998) and retention of snowpack (Tomback and others 2001).

Citation

Smith, Cyndi M.; Shepherd, Brenda; Gillies, Cameron; Stuart-Smith, Jon. 2011. Re-measurement of whitebark pine infection and mortality in the Canadian Rockies. In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 238-241.