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Purshia DC. ex Poir.: bitterbrush, cliffrose

Posted date: April 14, 2009
Publication Year: 
2008
Authors: Booth, D. Terrance; Meyer, Susan E.Shaw, Nancy L.
Publication Series: 
Agricultural Handbook
Source: In: Bonner, Franklin T.; Karrfalt, Robert P., eds. The Woody Plant Seed Manual. Agric. Handbook No. 727. Washington, DC. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. p. 916-921.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

The bitterbrush genus - Purshia - as presently circumscribed comprises 8 species of decumbent to arborescent shrubs of interior western North America. Three are common in the United States (table 1). The type species - antelope bitterbrush - has an essentially northern distribution, whereas cliffrose has an essentially southern distribution, and desert bitterbrush occurs in parts of the geographic area where the other 2 species have overlapping distributions. Cliffrose, along with the 5 Mexican species of the genus, has been traditionally referred to the genus Cowania D. Don. Cliffrose regularly forms hybrids with antelope bitterbrush, and desert bitterbrush could be interpreted as a stabilized hybrid between these species (Stutz and Thomas 1964). In fact, molecular genetics work by Jabbes (2000) indicates that Purshia was derived from Cowania. We follow Welsh and others (1987) in treating the group as congeneric under the name Purshia.

Citation

Booth, D. Terrance; Meyer, Susan E.; Shaw, Nancy L. 2008. Purshia DC. ex Poir.: bitterbrush, cliffrose. In: Bonner, Franklin T.; Karrfalt, Robert P., eds. The Woody Plant Seed Manual. Agric. Handbook No. 727. Washington, DC. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. p. 916-921.
Research Topics: 
Wildlife (or Fauna)
National Strategic Program Areas: 
Resource Management and Use