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Origin of political conflict in Arctic wilderness areas

Posted date: September 30, 2011
Publication Year: 
2002
Authors: Gladden, James N.
Publication Series: 
Proceedings (P)
Source: In: Watson, Alan E.; Alessa, Lilian; Sproull, Janet, comps. Wilderness in the Circumpolar North: searching for compatibility in ecological, traditional, and ecotourism values; 2001 May 15-16; Anchorage, AK. Proceedings RMRS-P-26. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 7-14.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

There are several important factors related to political conflict associated with arctic wilderness areas: scientific studies, economic interests, ethnic identities, geographic differences, and national histories. How groups with an interest in these wilderness areas inject their values into these factors stimulates political debate with each other and with stewarding agency officials. Analyzing the mixed currents of scientific, economic, ethnic, geographic, and historical values of user groups can help officials better appreciate the politics of managing wilderness areas. This work also points out three shared goals of the eight arctic nation-states for managing wilderness areas in the circumpolar region.

Citation

Gladden, James N. 2002. Origin of political conflict in Arctic wilderness areas. In: Watson, Alan E.; Alessa, Lilian; Sproull, Janet, comps. Wilderness in the Circumpolar North: searching for compatibility in ecological, traditional, and ecotourism values; 2001 May 15-16; Anchorage, AK. Proceedings RMRS-P-26. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 7-14.