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Landscape scale effects of fuel management or fire on water resources: The future of cumulative effects analysis?

Posted date: January 12, 2010
Publication Year: 
2010
Authors: Luce, Charles H.; Rieman, Bruce E.
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Elliot, William J.; Miller, Ina Sue; Audin, Lisa, eds. Cumulative watershed effects of fuel management in the western United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-231. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 234-245.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Wildfire may pose serious threats to both direct (for example, heating, dissolved toxic gases) and indirect (for instance, post-fire floods, erosion, changing habitat), aquatic ecosystems (Dunham and others 2003; Gresswell 1999). There is, however, increasing recognition that major flood, erosion, and mass wasting events after fires can also be important to the formation of complex habitats that are beneficial in the long-term (Bisson and others 2003; Reeves and others 1995).

Citation

Luce, Charles H.; Rieman, Bruce E. 2010. Landscape scale effects of fuel management or fire on water resources: The future of cumulative effects analysis? In: Elliot, William J.; Miller, Ina Sue; Audin, Lisa, eds. Cumulative watershed effects of fuel management in the western United States. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-231. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 234-245.