You are here

Invasive species in southern Nevada [Chapter 4] (Executive Summary)

Posted date: September 09, 2013
Publication Year: 
2013
Authors: Brooks, Matthew L.; Ostoja, Steven M.; Chambers, Jeanne C.
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Chambers, Jeanne C.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Pendleton, Burton K.; Raish, Carol B., eds. The Southern Nevada Agency Partnership Science and Research Synthesis: Science to support land management in Southern Nevada - Executive Summary. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-304. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 19-24.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Southern Nevada contains a wide range of topographies, elevations, and climatic zones that are emblematic of its position at the ecotone between the Mojave Desert, Great Basin, and Colorado Plateau ecoregions. These varied environmental conditions support a high degree of biological diversity, but they also provide opportunities for a wide range of invasive species. In addition, the population center of Las Vegas valley and agricultural areas scattered throughout Clark, Lincoln, and Nye counties, all connected by a network of roads and highways, plus ephemeral and perennial watercourses, provide abundant opportunities for new invaders to be transported into and within southern Nevada. Invasive species are a major concern for land managers because of their capacity to compete with native species, change habitat conditions, and alter ecosystem properties.

Citation

Brooks, Matthew L.; Ostoja, Steven M.; Chambers, Jeanne C.. 2013. Invasive species in southern Nevada [Chapter 4] (Executive Summary). In: Chambers, Jeanne C.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Pendleton, Burton K.; Raish, Carol B., eds. The Southern Nevada Agency Partnership Science and Research Synthesis: Science to support land management in Southern Nevada - Executive Summary. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-304. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 19-24.