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Invasive Species Science Update (No. 3)

Posted date: May 07, 2009
Publication Year: 
2009
Authors: Kim, Mee-Sook Coord.; Butler, Jack L.
Publication Series: 
Invasive Species Science Update
Source: Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 6 p.

Abstract

Although scientific journals are the traditional method for disseminating research results, information must be distributed more rapidly and widely using approaches that connect researchers directly with managers. The exchange of information between science producer and science user would appear to be straightforward because, for the most part, the two groups speak the same language. An equally important goal involves supplying relevant information to the decision makers who allocate resources but who often lack specific knowledge of the issue. Done correctly, this three-way exchange of information among researchers, managers, and deciders on invasive species issues has great potential for increasing awareness, political commitment and, by extension, financial commitment. Browne and his colleagues also stressed the need to incorporate ecosystem approaches, adaptive management, stakeholder involvement, and a mechanism for feedback. Conceptually, the process makes sense - especially for invasive species, which have such an immediate, direct, and devastating impact on natural resources. However, from a variety of perspectives, the current level of investment in invasive species research and management is incongruent with the scale and long-term implications of their impacts.

Citation

Kim, Mee-Sook, Coord.; Butler, Jack, ed. 2009. Invasive Species Science Update (No. 3). Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 6 p.