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Inoculation and successful colonization of whitebark pine seedlings with native mycorrhizal fungi under greenhouse conditions

Posted date: July 05, 2011
Publication Year: 
2011
Authors: Cripps, C. L.; Grimme, E.
Publication Series: 
Proceedings (P)
Source: In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 312-322.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Efforts to maintain and restore whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) forests in western North America have increased dramatically over the last two decades and now include the planting of nursery-grown rust resistant seedlings in openings and burned areas. Over 200,000 nursery seedlings have been planted in the western U.S. but survival rates are low and in many areas approach zero. One possibility for enhancing seedling survival is application of mycorrhizal fungi in the greenhouse before out-planting. All pines require ectomycorrhizal fungi (ECM) to survive in nature, including whitebark pine.

Citation

Cripps, C. L.; Grimme, E. 2011. Inoculation and successful colonization of whitebark pine seedlings with native mycorrhizal fungi under greenhouse conditions. In: Keane, Robert E.; Tomback, Diana F.; Murray, Michael P.; Smith, Cyndi M., eds. The future of high-elevation, five-needle white pines in Western North America: Proceedings of the High Five Symposium. 28-30 June 2010; Missoula, MT. Proceedings RMRS-P-63. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 312-322.