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Impacts of interacting fire, climate, and hydrologic changes on riparian forest ecosystems in the Southwest [Chapter 3]

Posted date: November 27, 2018
Publication Year: 
2018
Authors: Smith, D. Max; Finch, Deborah M.
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Johnson, R. Roy; Carothers, Steven W.; Finch, Deborah M.; Kingsley, Kenneth J.; Stanley, John T., tech. eds. 2018. Riparian research and management: Past, present, future: Volume 1. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-377. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 32-46. doi: http://doi.org/10.2737/RMRS-GTR-377-CHAP3.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Changes in human populations, water use, climate, and related disturbances are impacting riparian ecosystems throughout the western United States. Nowhere is this more pronounced than in the arid American Southwest (Gutzler 2013; Molles et al. 1998; Webb et al. 2007). Changes in southwestern riparian ecosystems are often visible to the casual eye in the form of reduced and channelized water along stream courses, loss or changes in riparian vegetation, fire, and urbanization. To manage these changes and improve ecosystem resiliency for the future, a better understanding of the impacts of stressors and disturbances on southwestern riparian ecosystems, and especially on resources of high value from human and ecological perspectives, is needed. We focus on aridland riparian forests in this chapter owing to their values for recreation, wildlife habitat, and energy and nutrient input.

Citation

Smith, D. Max; Finch, Deborah M. 2018. Impacts of interacting fire, climate, and hydrologic changes on riparian forest ecosystems in the Southwest [Chapter 3]. In: Johnson, R. Roy; Carothers, Steven W.; Finch, Deborah M.; Kingsley, Kenneth J.; Stanley, John T., tech. eds. 2018. Riparian research and management: Past, present, future: Volume 1. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-377. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 32-46. doi: http://doi.org/10.2737/RMRS-GTR-377-CHAP3.