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Forest soil microbial communities: Using metagenomic approaches to survey permanent plots

Posted date: August 25, 2015
Publication Year: 
2014
Publication Series: 
Paper (invited, offered, keynote)
Source: In: Chadwick, K.; Palacios, P., comps. Proceedings of the 61st Annual Western International Forest Disease Work Conference; October 6-11, 2013; Waterton Lakes National Park; AB, Canada. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Health Protection. p. 139-142.

Abstract

Forest soil ecosystems include some of the most complex microbial communities on Earth (Fierer et al. 2012). These assemblages of archaea, bacteria, fungi, and protists play essential roles in biogeochemical cycles (van der Heijden et al. 2008) and account for considerable terrestrial biomass (Nielsen et al. 2011). Yet, determining the microbial composition of forest soils remains a great challenge due in part to their overwhelming diversity and variability. Until recently, studies of microbial diversity in natural systems have relied on clonal cultures. Early environmental gene sequencing, which cloned specific genes to produce a profile of diversity in a natural sample, revealed that the vast majority of microbial diversity had been overlooked using these direct cultivation methods.

Citation

Ross-Davis, Amy L.; Stewart, Jane E.; Hanna, John W.; Shaw, John D.; Hudak, Andrew T.; Jain, Theresa B.; Denner, Robert J.; Graham, Russell T.; Page-Dumroese, Deborah S.; Tirocke, Joanne M.; Kim, Mee-Sook; Klopfenstein, Ned B. 2014. Forest soil microbial communities: Using metagenomic approaches to survey permanent plots. In: Chadwick, K.; Palacios, P., comps. Proceedings of the 61st Annual Western International Forest Disease Work Conference; October 6-11, 2013; Waterton Lakes National Park; AB, Canada. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Health Protection. p. 139-142.