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Fire effects on rock images and similar cultural resources [Chapter 5]

Posted date: April 03, 2012
Publication Year: 
2012
Authors: Kelly, Roger E.; McCarthy, Daniel F.
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Ryan, Kevin C.; Jones, Ann Trinkle; Koerner, Cassandra L.; Lee, Kristine M., tech. eds. Wildland fire in ecosystems: effects of fire on cultural resources and archaeology. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-42-vol. 3. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 113-130.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Throughout human global history, people have purposely altered natural rock surfaces by drilling, drawing, painting, incising, pecking, abrading and chiseling images into stone. Some rock types that present suitable media surfaces for these activities are fine-grained sandstones and granites, basalts, volcanic tuff, dolomites, and limestones. Commonly called rock "art," depiction of patterns, images, inscriptions, or graphic representations might be considered today as 'artistic' as is Old World Paleolithic “cave art” for example, but most of those early originators attached different cultural values to these expressions. Historic rock inscriptions made by literate persons are also of high value as "documents."

Citation

Kelly, Roger E.; McCarthy, Daniel F. 2012. Fire effects on rock images and similar cultural resources [Chapter 5]. In: Ryan, Kevin C.; Jones, Ann Trinkle; Koerner, Cassandra L.; Lee, Kristine M., tech. eds. Wildland fire in ecosystems: effects of fire on cultural resources and archaeology. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-42-vol. 3. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 113-130.