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Fire effects on flaked stone, ground stone, and other stone artifacts [Chapter 4]

Posted date: April 03, 2012
Publication Year: 
2012
Authors: Deal, Krista
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Ryan, Kevin C.; Jones, Ann Trinkle; Koerner, Cassandra L.; Lee, Kristine M., tech. eds. Wildland fire in ecosystems: effects of fire on cultural resources and archaeology. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-42-vol. 3. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 97-111.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Lithic artifacts can be divided into two broad classes, flaked stone and ground stone, that overlap depending on the defining criteria. For this discussion, flaked stone is used to describe objects that cut, scrape, pierce, saw, hack, etch, drill, or perforate, and the debris (debitage) created when these items are manufactured. Objects made of flaked stone include projectile points, knives, drills, scrapers, planes, burins, gravers, spokeshaves, choppers, saws, cores, flakes, fish hooks, hoes, and hand axes, among others. These were commonly made from chert, flint, chalcedony, petrified and opalized wood, slate, siltsone, mudstone, quartz, quartzite, obsidian, basalt, metamorphic rocks, and vitrified and welded tuff.

Citation

Deal, Krista. 2012. Fire effects on flaked stone, ground stone, and other stone artifacts [Chapter 4]. In: Ryan, Kevin C.; Jones, Ann Trinkle; Koerner, Cassandra L.; Lee, Kristine M., tech. eds. Wildland fire in ecosystems: effects of fire on cultural resources and archaeology. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-42-vol. 3. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 97-111.