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Emergence of native plant seeds in response to seed pelleting, planting depth, scarification, and soil anti-crusting treatment, 2009

Posted date: August 13, 2010
Publication Year: 
2010
Authors: Shock, Clint; Feibert, Erik; Saunders, Lamont; Shaw, Nancy L.
Publication Series: 
Miscellaneous Publication
Source: In: Malheur Experiment Station Annual Report 2009. Ontario, OR: Oregon State University, Malheur Agricultural Experiment Station. p. 218-222.

Abstract

Seed of native plants is needed to restore rangelands of the Intermountain West. Reliable commercial seed production is desirable to provide the quantity of seed needed for restoration efforts. Establishment of native seed crops has been difficult, because fall-planted seed is susceptible to bird damage, soil crusting, and soil erosion. Fall planting is important for many species, because seed of many species requires a period of cold to break dormancy (vernalization). Planting of native seed has resulted in poor stands in some years at the Malheur Experiment Station. This trial tested seed pelleting, planting depth, and soil conditioner treatment for emergence of five important species that are native to Malheur County and surrounding areas.

Citation

Shock, Clint; Feibert, Erik; Saunders, Lamont; Shaw, Nancy. 2010. Emergence of native plant seeds in response to seed pelleting, planting depth, scarification, and soil anti-crusting treatment, 2009. In: Malheur Experiment Station Annual Report 2009. Ontario, OR: Oregon State University, Malheur Agricultural Experiment Station. p. 218-222.