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Effects of salvage logging on fire risks after bark beetle outbreaks in Colorado lodgepole pine forests

Posted date: March 07, 2013
Publication Year: 
2012
Publication Series: 
Scientific Journal (JRNL)
Source: Fire Management Today. 72(3): 18-22.

Abstract

Most mature lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia Engelm. ex Wats.) forests in the central and southern Rocky Mountains originated after stand-replacing wildfires or logging (Brown 1975, Lotan and Perry 1983, Romme 1982). In recent years, mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) outbreaks have created a widespread, synchronous disturbance (i.e., greater than 1.4 million hectares of pine forests in Colorado and southeastern Wyoming since 1996) (USDA 2010) that will shape forest dynamics for the coming century. Compared with the ample knowledge of how lodgepole forests recover after fire and harvesting (Lotan and Perry 1983), the trajectory of stand development and forest disturbance set in motion by bark beetle outbreaks is poorly understood.

Citation

Collins, Bryon J.; Rhoades, Chuck C.; Battaglia, Michael A.; Hubbard, Robert M. 2012. Effects of salvage logging on fire risks after bark beetle outbreaks in Colorado lodgepole pine forests. Fire Management Today. 72(3): 18-22.