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Effects and interactions of fire, logging, and grazing

Posted date: August 01, 2018
Publication Year: 
1997
Authors: Finch, Deborah M.Ganey, Joseph L.; Yong, Wang; Kimball, Rebecca T.; Sallabanks, Rex
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Block, William M.; Finch, Deborah M. (Tech. eds.). Songbird ecology in southwestern ponderosa pine forests: a literature review. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-292. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. p. 103-136.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

In this chapter, we summarize current knowledge about the effects of fire, logging, and grazing on coniferous forest birds and their habitats. We critically review the results of studies evaluating how these individual factors influence bird numbers, species diversity, nesting success, and habitat use in ponderosa pine forests. Documented and potential interactions among fire, fire exclusion, logging, livestock grazing, and range management are discussed in relation to habitat structure, succession, and avian use. Finally, we outline some areas where further research is needed to better understand the effects of fire, logging, grazing, and their interactions on birds and their habitats in Southwestern ponderosa pine forests.

Citation

Finch, Deborah M.; Ganey, Joseph L.; Yong, Wang; Kimball, Rebecca T.; Sallabanks, Rex. 1997. Effects and interactions of fire, logging, and grazing. In: Block, William M.; Finch, Deborah M. (Tech. eds.). Songbird ecology in southwestern ponderosa pine forests: a literature review. Gen. Tech. Rep. RM-292. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station. p. 103-136.