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Ecological wilderness restoration: Attitudes toward restoring the Mount Logan Wilderness

Posted date: September 24, 2014
Publication Year: 
2001
Authors: DeMillion, Marcy A.; Lee, Martha E.
Publication Series: 
Proceedings (P)
Source: In: Vance, Regina K.; Edminster, Carleton B.; Covington, W. Wallace; Blake, Julie A., comps. Ponderosa pine ecosystems restoration and conservation: steps toward stewardship; 2000 April 25-27; Flagstaff, AZ. Proceedings RMRS-P-22. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 130-133.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

By law, wilderness areas are intended to be unmarred landscapes where evidence of modern civilization is generally absent. This presents a problem, since ecological wilderness conditions have been impaired by human activities. For example, some forest wilderness ecosystems have been altered by livestock grazing, logging, fire exclusion, and through other environmental manipulations. Additionally, there are socio-political factors that must be considered prior to discussing wilderness restoration methods. This paper focuses on the need for ecological wilderness restoration and presents options for managers to consider while discussing wilderness restoration. To determine the most preferred wilderness restoration method among communities located near the Bureau of Land Management Arizona Strip Field Office, a social survey was conducted that focused on attitudes of community residents living in proximity to the Mount Logan Wilderness, which is in northern Arizona within the Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument. The study focused on this wilderness because an ecological restoration project was occurring outside the wilderness boundary. The survey was designed to determine the local acceptance of a mechanical, nonmechanical, or prescribed fire wilderness restoration method. Mechanical methods are often the most controversial, but survey respondents held the most positive attitude toward this method. Key Words: ponderosa pine, ecosystem management, landscape management, restoration, conservation, fire behavior, cost effectiveness analysis

Citation

DeMillion, Marcy A.; Lee, Martha E. 2001. Ecological wilderness restoration: Attitudes toward restoring the Mount Logan Wilderness. In: Vance, Regina K.; Edminster, Carleton B.; Covington, W. Wallace; Blake, Julie A., comps. Ponderosa pine ecosystems restoration and conservation: steps toward stewardship; 2000 April 25-27; Flagstaff, AZ. Proceedings RMRS-P-22. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 130-133.