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Ecological effects of the Hayman Fire - Part 8: Effects on species of concern

Posted date: September 27, 2007
Publication Year: 
2003
Authors: Kotliar, Natasha B.; Simonson, Sara; Chong, Geneva; Theobald, Dave
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Graham, Russell T., Technical Editor. Hayman Fire Case Study. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-114. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 250-262
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Conclusions about the effects of fire on species of concern will depend on the temporal and spatial scales of analysis. Populations of some species may decline in abundance immediately postfire due to alteration or destruction of habitat, but over larger spatial and temporal scales, fire contributes to a shifting mosaic of habitat conditions across the landscape. Whether or not a fire results in persistent and significant population changes depends on a number of factors including fire size and severity, dispersal capabilities and other life history traits, availability of refugia within or outside the burn, postfire successional pathways. Thus, fire effects should be considered across a range of temporal and spatial scales.

Citation

Kotliar, Natasha B.; Simonson, Sara; Chong, Geneva; Theobald, Dave 2003. Ecological effects of the Hayman Fire - Part 8: Effects on species of concern. In: Graham, Russell T., Technical Editor. Hayman Fire Case Study. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-114. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 250-262