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Ecological effects of the Hayman Fire - Part 7: Key invasive nonnative plants

Posted date: September 27, 2007
Publication Year: 
2003
Authors: Chong, Geneva; Stohlgren, Tom; Crosier, Catherine; Simonson, Sara; Newman, Greg; Petterson, Eric
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Graham, Russell T., Technical Editor. Hayman Fire Case Study. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-114. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 244-249
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Invasive, nonnative plant species pose one of the greatest potential threats to long-term ecosystem integrity in the area burned by the 2002 Hayman Fire. In other ecosystems, nonnative invaders have been shown to cause decline of native plant species and pollinators, as well as adverse changes in fire regimes, nutrient cycling, and hydrology. Thus, invasive, nonnative species may be responsible for some of the most serious ecological impacts and the greatest long-term costs (for example, for mitigation) associated with the Hayman Fire. Early detection and subsequent monitoring will be essential for the most cost-effective control and the subsequent reduction of negative effects.

Citation

Chong, Geneva; Stohlgren, Tom; Crosier, Catherine; Simonson, Sara; Newman, Greg; Petterson, Eric 2003. Ecological effects of the Hayman Fire - Part 7: Key invasive nonnative plants. In: Graham, Russell T., Technical Editor. Hayman Fire Case Study. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-114. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 244-249