You are here

Ecological effects of the Hayman Fire - Part 4: Forest succession

Posted date: September 27, 2007
Publication Year: 
2003
Authors: Romme, William H.; Regan, Claudia M.; Kaufmann, Merrill R.; Huckaby, Laurie Kay Stroh; Veblen, Thomas T.
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Graham, Russell T., Technical Editor. Hayman Fire Case Study. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-114. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 220-227
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

The ecosystems within the area that burned in the Hayman Fire have a long history of fire (see part 1 of this chapter). It follows, therefore, that all of the native species and populations in this area probably have one or more mechanisms for enduring fire or becoming reestablished after fire and that no native species is likely to become extinct as a result of the direct effects of the Hayman Fire. It also follows that active rehabilitation is not required for all of the burned area. In fact, much or even most of the area is likely to recover normally without intervention, and in some areas our well-intentioned rehabilitation efforts actually could interfere with natural recovery processes.

Citation

Romme, William H.; Regan, Claudia M.; Kaufmann, Merrill R.; Huckaby, Laurie; Veblen, Thomas T. 2003. Ecological effects of the Hayman Fire - Part 4: Forest succession. In: Graham, Russell T., Technical Editor. Hayman Fire Case Study. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-114. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 220-227.