You are here

Development and use of plant resources for western wildlands

Posted date: June 05, 2012
Publication Year: 
2001
Authors: Monsen, Stephen B.; Shaw, Nancy L.
Publication Series: 
Proceedings (P)
Source: In: McArthur, E. Durant; Fairbanks, Daniel J., comps. Shrubland ecosystem genetics and biodiversity: proceedings; 2000 June 13-15; Provo, UT. Proc. RMRS-P-21. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 47-61.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Concern for declines in big game habitat throughout the West and the pioneering work of revegetation researchers in the mid twentieth century led to increased use of native shrubs, grasses, and forbs for revegetation, and the 1975 establishment of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Shrub Sciences Laboratory in Provo, Utah. During this period revegetation objectives shifted from an emphasis on production of commodities to conservation of biodiversity and ecosystem functions. Plant resource development altered from an agronomic approach focusing on plant improvement to one that incorporates ecological, genetic, and practical considerations. Although many problems remain, research, technological advances, efforts to stabilize the native seed industry, and improved seed testing and certification procedures are increasing our options for revegetating disturbed lands.

Citation

Monsen, Stephen B.; Shaw, Nancy L. 2001. Development and use of plant resources for western wildlands. In: McArthur, E. Durant; Fairbanks, Daniel J., comps. Shrubland ecosystem genetics and biodiversity: proceedings; 2000 June 13-15; Provo, UT. Proc. RMRS-P-21. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 47-61.