You are here

Current and potential use of broadleaf herbs for reestablishing native communities

Posted date: May 12, 2016
Publication Year: 
2005
Authors: Walker, Scott C.; Shaw, Nancy L.
Publication Series: 
Proceedings (P)
Source: In: Shaw, Nancy L.; Pellant, Mike; Monsen, Stephen B., comps. 2005. Sage-grouse habitat restoration symposium proceedings; 2001 June 4-7, Boise, ID. Proc. RMRS-P-38. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 56-61
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Use of forbs for revegetation in the Intermountain West has been problematic due to the large number of species and lack of research data. Some forbs are found in numerous plant communities and distributed over wide geographic ranges while others are more narrowly adapted. Seed sources for revegetation use may be selected from species and ecotypes indigenous to the planting area. Management of local stands to improve seed production may be required to insure the availability of adequate quantities of seed. Alternatively, seed of an increasing number of commonly used species is being grown in agricultural settings with more reliable seed supplies resulting. Advances in wildland seeding methodology and forb seed production, harvesting, and conditioning technology have resulted from recent research and plant materials development programs.

Citation

Walker, Scott C.; Shaw, Nancy L. 2005. Current and potential use of broadleaf herbs for reestablishing native communities. In: Shaw, Nancy L.; Pellant, Mike; Monsen, Stephen B., comps. 2005. Sage-grouse habitat restoration symposium proceedings; 2001 June 4-7, Boise, ID. Proc. RMRS-P-38. Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 56-61