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Cotoneaster Medik.: cotoneaster

Posted date: April 14, 2009
Publication Year: 
2008
Authors: Slabaugh, Paul E.; Shaw, Nancy L.
Publication Series: 
Agricultural Handbook
Source: In: Bonner, Franklin T.; Karrfalt, Robert P., eds. The Woody Plant Seed Manual. Agric. Handbook No. 727. Washington, DC. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. p. 442-446.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

The genus Cotoneaster includes about 50 species of shrubs and small trees native to the temperate regions of Europe, northern Africa, and Asia (excepting Japan) (Cumming 1960). Growth habits range from nearly prostrate to upright. Coldhardy types are more or less deciduous, whereas those native to warmer regions are evergreen (Heriteau 1990). Cotoneasters are valued as ornamentals for their glossy green foliage, attractive fruits, and interesting growth habits. Fall foliage color is often a showy blend of orange and red. Cotoneasters are adapted to sunny locations with moderately deep and moderately well-drained silty to sandy soils. Several hardy species are commonly used in mass plantings, hedges, shelterbelts, wildlife plantings, windbreaks, recreational areas, and along transportation corridors on the northern Great Plains, the southern portions of adjoining Canadian provinces, and occasionally in the Intermountain region and other areas (Plummer and others 1968; Shaw and others 2004; Slabaugh 1974). They require little maintenance and provide ground cover, soil stabilization, snow entrapment, and aesthetic values. Peking cotoneaster provides food and cover for wildlife (Johnson and Anderson 1980; Kufeld and others 1973; Leach 1956; Miller and others 1948). Six species used in conservation plantings are described in table 1 (Hoag 1965; Nonnecke 1954; Plummer and others 1977; Rheder 1940; USDA SCS 1988; Zucker 1966). Use of cotoneasters in some areas may be limited due to their susceptibility to fire blight (infection with the bacterium Erwinia amylovora), borers (Chrysobothris femorata (Olivier)), lace bugs (Corythucha cydonia (Fitch)), and red spiders (Oligonychus platani (McGregor)(Griffiths 1994; Krussmann 1986; Wyman 1986).

Citation

Slabaugh, Paul E.; Shaw, Nancy L. 2008. Cotoneaster Medik.: cotoneaster. In: Bonner, Franklin T.; Karrfalt, Robert P., eds. The Woody Plant Seed Manual. Agric. Handbook No. 727. Washington, DC. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. p. 442-446.