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Cost / effectiveness analysis of ponderosa pine ecosystem restoration in Flagstaff Arizona's wildland-urban interface

Posted date: September 24, 2014
Publication Year: 
2001
Authors: Pinjuv, Guy; Daugherty, P. J.; Fox, Bruce E.
Publication Series: 
Proceedings (P)
Source: In: Vance, Regina K.; Edminster, Carleton B.; Covington, W. Wallace; Blake, Julie A., comps. Ponderosa pine ecosystems restoration and conservation: steps toward stewardship; 2000 April 25-27; Flagstaff, AZ. Proceedings RMRS-P-22. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 149-153.
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Ponderosa pine ecosystem restoration in Fort Valley (located east of Flagstaff, Arizona) has been proposed as a method of restoring ecosystem health and lowering the risk of catastrophic wildfire in Flagstaff's wildland-urban interface. Three methods of harvest are being used to carry out restoration treatments: hand harvesting, cut-to-length harvesting, and whole-tree mechanized harvesting. This paper presents a theoretical application of a cost / effectiveness analysis to aid in recommendation of an optimum method of harvest for restoration treatments. Harvest methods can be compared on the basis of ratios of harvest cost / effectiveness. Effectiveness in this approach is defined as a harvest method's ability to carry out restoration treatment with the least negative impact on residual stand damage, soil impacts, and fuel loading.

Citation

Pinjuv, Guy; Daugherty, P. J.; Fox, Bruce E. 2001. Cost / effectiveness analysis of ponderosa pine ecosystem restoration in Flagstaff Arizona's wildland-urban interface. In: Vance, Regina K.; Edminster, Carleton B.; Covington, W. Wallace; Blake, Julie A., comps. Ponderosa pine ecosystems restoration and conservation: steps toward stewardship; 2000 April 25-27; Flagstaff, AZ. Proceedings RMRS-P-22. Ogden, UT: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. p. 149-153.