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Congruent climate-related genecological responses from molecular markers and quantitative traits for western white pine (Pinus monticola)

Posted date: March 04, 2010
Publication Year: 
2009
Authors: Richardson, Bryce A.; Rehfeldt, Gerald E.; Kim, Mee-Sook
Publication Series: 
Miscellaneous Publication
Source: International Journal of Plant Sciences. 170(9): 1120-1131.

Abstract

Analyses of molecular and quantitative genetic data demonstrate the existence of congruent climate-related patterns in western white pine (Pinus monticola). Two independent studies allowed comparisons of amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers with quantitative variation in adaptive traits. Principal component analyses were conducted on seedling traits in common gardens collected from 58 sites; principal coordinate analyses were conducted on AFLP data from 15 sites. Collection site eigenvector means were regressed on 35 climate variables to produce a genecological prediction for each data set. Both predictions explained a large percentage (>70%) of the genetic variation from the first eigenvector from similar predictors involving the interaction growing season precipitation and temperature. Both predictions were significant (P < 0:01), and projected genecological maps were largely congruent. The predominant pattern from the first eigenvector was two major groups, a northern and a southern, connected by a steep cline across the crest of the southern Cascade Range of Oregon. This cline was associated with growth potential in the adaptive traits. These results suggest that divergent climatic selection has influenced phenotypic traits associated with growth. Furthermore, the congruence of AFLPs suggests a linkage between some loci and genomic regions under selection and/or climatic influences on postmating reproductive success.

Citation

Richardson, Bryce A.; Rehfeldt, Gerald E.; Kim, Mee-Sook. 2009. Congruent climate-related genecological responses from molecular markers and quantitative traits for western white pine (Pinus monticola). International Journal of Plant Sciences. 170(9): 1120-1131.