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Conflicting goals of wilderness management: natural conditions vs. natural experiences

Posted date: April 19, 2007
Publication Year: 
1995
Authors: Watson, Alan E.; Niccolucci, Michael J.
Publication Series: 
General Technical Report (GTR)
Source: In: Chavez, Deborah J., tech. coord. Proceedings of the Second Symposium on Social Aspects and Recreation Research, February 23-25, 1994, San Diego, California. Gen. Tech. Rep PSW-GTR-156. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 11-15
Note: This article is part of a larger document.

Abstract

Beliefs and attitudes underlying wilderness visitors’ support for use restrictions were studied. Some evidence shows that in overused places visitors cite both protection of the resource and the wilderness experience as reasons for supporting restrictions. The research reported here provides the opportunity to assess the relative contribution of each of these reasons, and others, to visitor support for use restrictions at three wildernesses in Oregon. Support for reducing the total amount of use was best predicted by crowding measures for day visitors and by a combination of crowding and physical environment impact (dominated by physical impacts) for overnight users. This knowledge has implications for other situations involving conflicting demands on natural resources.

Citation

Watson, Alan E.; Niccolucci, Michael J. 1995. Conflicting goals of wilderness management: natural conditions vs. natural experiences. In: Chavez, Deborah J., tech. coord. Proceedings of the Second Symposium on Social Aspects and Recreation Research, February 23-25, 1994, San Diego, California. Gen. Tech. Rep PSW-GTR-156. Albany, CA: Pacific Southwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture: 11-15